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20130223
20130223
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
years. if you look at the electorate when bill clinton got elected, and ronald reagan got elected, they use this to bring up their base and maximize their vote. they use the far right to do it. >> well, it used to be -- >> since there's not enough of them. >> for every african-american vote, or latino vote is probably a better point, you would lose a vote in the southwest but that's not exactly happening. the white vote has been up a bit for obama and african-american and other minority votes zoomed. >> they lost the cities. losing more educated white voters along with minority voters and part of the problem is them. the messaging they use for their base turns off obviously younger people. turns off women. turns off minorities and this time they really got minorities excited about voting. when you do things to prevent people from voting, that made that vote solidify and come out and visit in 2008. >> this is the problem they have. the leadership, michael gerschwins of the world, they alienate the people who vote for the party. >> angry guy in arizona. >> john mccain, town hall mee
as counselor to democratic president bill clinton. you left the clinton administration before his showdown with republicans in congress that led to the last government shutdown in 1995-1996 when the public largely blamed then speaker newt gingrich and the republicans for that fiasco. let's assume republicans don't want a repeat of that this time around. the just the threat of the shutdown enough to weigh on the calculations made by both sides? >> it may well be that the combination of the sequester and the continuing resolution, the shutdown, will force people back to the table. i think there's a good possibility of that. i agree with ron brownstein that' we're very unlikely to have a shutdown. but i would caution this, ali. we've had 17 shutdowns since 1976. they're usually quite brief. they're blips on the screen. the one we had that you're recalling, '95-96, was a much more serious shutdown. it was a showdown between president clinton and newt gingrich and the president won. but what was very important about that was it cleared the air. the shutdown and the collapse on the republican si
proper income tax payers, they're going to go back to the clinton era tax relief. the point i am trying to make with this one chart, this is the real world and the idea tax cuts favored themselves is not the real world and when one side believes one thing and one side believes the other there's not much room for a consequence. i will come back to why and this should be how you think about this one. why is it that the two sides believed such different things? why does one depend on evidence and the other depend more on broad principles about the size of government and individual liberty and so forth and so on? let me if i can do this, let me go back and let me move on to the experience with iraq. you all understand most people would agree the signature issue for the bush administration, the one that had the most consequence and the ones that will shape the bush administration's place in history, tax cuts and invasion of iraq. you can imagine how difficult these decisions were and with respect to iraq before going in and giving hundreds of billions of dollars you can imagine it took a lot
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)